The Trail Running Athlete Photographer Balance

For twenty years, I’ve been both an athlete and professional photographer. The ten years prior to becoming a photographer, I was a full time athlete, keeping busy as a rock climber and road bike racer. When I became a photographer, my two worlds merged. Then, together with my wife Janine, we made a career out of this lifestyle. My “I” …

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You did not run there! We ran there!

I recently came across the social media hash tag #youdidnotsleepthere. In case you haven’t seen it, it’s a feed of nothing but photos being called out as bullshit. I see this stuff all the time, we all do. It drives me crazy. To see a kayak on a lake in the Alps with views of the Matterhorn is beautiful. But …

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Sony RX100 and a6300 Reviewed for Mountain Sports

As a pro mountain sport photographer, and someone working and playing in the mountains more than 300 days a year, I used to dream of having a camera light enough to not be a burden but also capable of producing the highest quality image files. I tried many systems but all came up short, the quality was not there. Then in 2012, …

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Do perfect photos equal a perfect experience?

Trails are a big part of my life. Come winter, my choices get limited to what lies below the snow line. As a result, I find myself exploring the forest. Part of what I do as a photographer is combine my daily trail runs with location scouting and social media posts. But in the forest there are issues; it’s dark, …

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The Sony a7II in the Nepal Himalaya

Back in September, I posted about making the switch to Sony after almost 20 years shooting Canon pro cameras. I’d been bombarded with the Sony a7 popping up in my social media and photography news sites and became intrigued to see what the hype was all about. At the same time, I was recognizing that Canon seemed sound asleep. My phone could do more …

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Switching from Canon to Sony for Mountain Sports

For years I’ve dreamt of having a simple, compact camera I barely notice. One that can make professional quality images, be fast enough for action, and be designed in such a way to allow me to be creative. The combo was tough, especially regarding speed. In 2013, we took notice of Sony’s RX100, it seemed the first point and shoot from which …

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Photographing a Feeling

“Jaaack!” Nothing. Silence. Darkness. I stood there in the warm summer evening wondering if I should try again. Armed with only a star chart and small flashlight who’s only function was dim red, I felt a little vulnerable in the pitch black night. “JACK”, I chirped once more. Nothing. Only an hour before I’d wandered a few hundred meters up behind …

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Sony Alpha a6000 Review for Mountain Sports

We are not camera reviewers or even remotely interested in camera tech. We just make photos, concentrating on the experience, with familiar gear we know to be reliable and of the highest quality. However, as professional photographers and athletes, we have long dreamt of a small camera capable of making perfect images for publication. One that would also have to …

The Dan and Janine Formula

It’s no secret that many of our images feature us, Dan & Janine, climbing, biking, ski touring and running – all in the mountains. For the last fifteen years, we’ve made the mountains our home and are in them each and every day. Our formula when we shoot ourselves has been simple, do what we love and photograph the experience. Our …

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Instagram vs Real Images

Throughout the years, Janine and I have had a hugely successful formula for both making images and finding locations – it is as simple as being out running, riding, hiking or skiing- and just paying attention. In 2012 we started using Instagram and have really enjoyed the platform for both sharing our work and seeing what others are doing. These …

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Travel Photography Gear List

“What gear do you use?” In all likelihood, we are the world’s worst photographer to ask about gear, it’s just not our thing. Nevertheless, the question always pops up. Our experience is that Canon’s high end camera bodies work very well, so we buy them as needed. Ditto for lenses. We never use filters, rarely a tripod, and went years …

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Making Respectful Travel Portraits

After our last post, Nepal Photography, we had a number of people comment and message us asking how we feel about getting so close to people to make travel photos. In that post, the lead image is a Buddhist child, he is filthy, his arms are tucked away inside his robe and he is sitting asking for alms. Clearly, the photo …